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The 'Free' Market, Public Goods, and the Making and Unmaking of Black Lives

Lester Spence
October 13th, 2017
12:00 PM

  Archived

Banner image credit: "Private Property" by Nathan O'nions, licensed uncer CC by 2.0

FSP | The 'Free' Market, Public Goods, and the Making and Unmaking of Black LivesFriday, October 13, 2017

Full Frame Theater (American Tobacco Campus)

Noon - 1:00 pm

Light refreshments served after the discussion

For this event, we are requesting registration (still free, still open to everyone until all the spots are filled). Please register here.

Join us for a discussion with Johns Hopkins University Professor Lester Spence about the ways inequality, government, entrepreneurship, and private investment impact black communities. This discussion will be moderated by Duke University Professor Adriane Lentz-Smith.

Over the past decade Professor Spence has published articles on American institutional legitimacy in the wake of the contentious 2000 Presidential election, the effects of long-term black political empowerment on black participation, the role of media narratives on black attitudes about HIV/AIDS, and the determinants of support for black nationalism. But with his first and second books (2011 W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award Winner Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics and Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics) he’s become particularly interested in studying the causes and consequences of growing inequality within black communities.

Copies of Knocking the Hustle will be for sale at the event by The Regulator Bookshop.

Cosponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics; the Department of African & African American Studies; the Center for Arts, Digital Culture, and Entrepreneurship; the Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity; Black Wall Street Homecoming; and Scalawag.

Lester Spence

Johns Hopkins University

Lester Spence is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies, and is one of two co-directors of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. An award winning scholar, author, and teacher, Dr. Spence has published two books (Stare in the Darkness: Hip-hop and the Limits of Black Politics winner of the 2012 W. E. B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award, and Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, winner of both the Baltimore City Paper and Baltimore Magazine 2016 Best Nonfiction Book Awards and was named to The Atlantic’s 2016 “Best Books We Missed” list), one co-edited journal, over a dozen academic articles and several dozen essays and think pieces in a range of publications including The American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, The New York Times, Jacobin, Salon, and The Boston Review. He is currently at work on two book length projects examining the contemporary AIDS crisis in black communities, and the growing role of police in major American cities. 

Adriane Lentz-Smith

Duke University

Adriane Lentz-Smith is Associate Professor of History at Duke University. She researches African American history and the history of the US & the World. Her 2009 book, Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I, looks at the black freedom struggle in the World War I years, with a particular focus on manhood, citizenship claims, and the international experience. Her recent research explores how African Americans engaged the world in the age of Cold War civil rights, and how their participation in US state and empire set the horizons of their freedom struggles.