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The Women's March: The Long View

February 6th, 2017
12:00 PM

  Archived

Monday, February 6, 2017

Forum for Scholars and Publics (Old Chemistry Building 011)

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Light lunch served

On Saturday, January 21st, massive demonstrations took place in 660 cities in the United States and throughout the world in one of the largest days of global protest in modern history. Join us for a wide-ranging panel discussion with Duke University scholars Laura Micham, Jocelyn Olcott, Deondra Rose, and Ara Wilson on the Women's March. We will discuss the place of the event within longer histories of feminist organizing, the cultural and symbolic politics at play in the march, its broader political and policy implications, and the possible futures of the movement. The event will be moderated by Laurent Dubois.

The event will take place at the Forum for Scholars & Publics, 011 Old Chemistry Building on Duke's West Campus.

For information on how to find us and where to park visit this page.

A light lunch will be available for all participants starting at 11:45. No registration is required.

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars & Publics, the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture, and the Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Duke University.

Laura Micham

Duke University Libraries

Laura Micham is the Merle Hoffman Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Curator of Gender and Sexuality History Collections in the Rubenstein Library. She helps acquire and promote the use of a wide range of rare and unique materials related to women, gender, and sexuality. Her particular interests include feminist activism and theory, reproductive health and rights, and the history and culture of LGBTQ communities.

Jocelyn Olcott

Duke University

Jocelyn Olcott is Associate Professor of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University. Mexico. Her first book, Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico, explores questions of gender and citizenship in the 1930s.  Her second book, International Women’s Year:  The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History considers the history and legacies of the United Nation’s first world conference on women in 1975 in Mexico City (Oxford University Press, forthcoming Spring 2017).  Her current project, a biography of the activist and folksinger Concha Michel, a one-time Communist who became an icon of maternalist feminism and a vocal advocate for recognizing the economic importance of subsistence labors, is under contract with Duke University Press.  The book follows Michel's life story from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth to examine the ways that the concept, labor, and policies surrounding “motherhood” articulated with major shifts in political-economic thought — from late-nineteenth-century liberalism to revolutionary nationalism, populism, modernization theory, dependency theory, and neoliberalism.

Deondra Rose

Duke University

Deondra Rose is an Assistant Professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on the feedback effects of landmark social policies on the American political landscape.  In addition to U.S. public/social policy, Dr. Rose’s research and teaching interests include higher education policy, American political development (APD), political behavior, identity politics (e.g., gender, race, and socioeconomic status), and inequality.  She is currently working on a book manuscript that examines the role that landmark higher education programs like the National Defense Education Act of 1958, the Higher Education Act of 1965, and Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments have played in shaping the progress that American women have made since the mid-twentieth century.

Ara Wilson

Duke University

Ara Wilson is Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Women's Studies at Duke University. Her work contributes to the feminist study of globalization and to what she calls queer political economy (QPE). In addition to long-term fieldwork in Bangkok, Thailand, she has studied sites of transnational feminist and LGBTQ organizing, for example, at UN conferences and the World Social Forum. Her book The Intimate Economies of Bangkok: Tomboys, Tycoons, and Avon Ladies in The Global City was published by the University of California Press in 2004.

Laurent Dubois

Duke University

Laurent Dubois is Professor of Romance Studies and History and the founder and Faculty Director of the Forum for Scholars & Publics at Duke University. From 2010 to 2013, he was the co-director of the Haiti Laboratory of the Franklin Humanities Institute. He is the author of six books, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004) and A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), which won four book prizes including the Frederick Douglass Prize, and Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He has also written about the politics of soccer, with Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France (2010) and is the founding editor of then Soccer Politics Blog. His most recent book is The Banjo: America's African Instrument (2016). He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Humanities Center Fellowship, and a Mellon New Directions Fellowship. He is also involved in several Digital Humanities projects, including the Soccer Politics blog and the Banjology website. His writings have appeared in The Nation, The New Yorker, Sports Illustrated, The New Republic, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and Slate. He tweets @Soccerpolitics.