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Crisis of the 'Negro' Intellectual? 50 Years Later

Wahneema Lubiano, Mark Anthony Neal, Lester Spence & Joseph Winters
October 12th, 2017
12:00 PM

  Archived

FSP | Crisis of the 'Negro' Intellectual? 50 Years LaterThursday, October 12, 2017
Forum for Scholars and Publics
12:00 - 1:15 pm

011 Old Chem
Duke's West Campus Quad
Map & Directions

 

Light lunch served

Join us as Professors Wahneema Lubiano, Mark Anthony Neal, Lester Spence, and Joseph Winters engage in a roundtable discussion of the legacy of Harold Cruse's The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual. Described as a book that "electrified a generation of activists and intellectuals" when it was published in 1967, what has been its lasting impact on American intellectual history? In what ways are contemporary scholars, artists, and activists still influenced by the arguments put forth in Cruse's provocative critique of black intellectual leadership?

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics; the Department of African & African American Studies; the Center for Arts, Digital Culture, and Entrepreneurship; and the Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity.

Wahneema Lubiano

Duke University

Wahneema Lubiano is Associate Professor of African and African American Studies and Literature at Duke University. She received her BA degree in English Literature and African-American Studies from Howard University, and her MA and PhD degrees in English Literature from Stanford University. Before coming to Duke she taught at Princeton University, the University of Texas at Austin, and Williams College. Her essays and articles have been published in Social Text, Cultural Critique, boundary 2, American Literary History, Callaloo, New England Quarterly, among other publications. She is author of the forthcoming books Messing With the Machine: Politics, Form and African-American Fiction and Like Being Mugged by a Metaphor: "Deep Cover" and Other "Black" Fictions, and editor of The House That Race Built: Black Americans, U.S. Terrain (1996). Her research and teaching interests include critical race theory, black American literature, black cultural studies, literary theory, semiotics, black popular culture, and feminist studies. In 2017, she was awarded the Raymond Gavins Distinguished Faculty Award from the Samuel DuBois Cook Society at Duke University.

 

Mark Anthony Neal

Duke University

Mark Anthony Neal is Professor of African & African American Studies and the founding director of the Center for Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship (CADCE) at Duke University where he offers courses on Black Masculinity, Popular Culture, and Digital Humanities, including signature courses on Michael Jackson & the Black Performance Tradition, and The History of Hip-Hop, which he co-teaches with Grammy Award Winning producer 9th Wonder (Patrick Douthit).

He is the author of several books including What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture (1999), Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic (2002) and Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities (2013). The 10th Anniversary edition of Neal’s New Black Man was published in February of 2015 by Routledge. Neal is co-editor of That's the Joint: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader (Routledge), now in its second edition. Additionally Neal hosts the video webcast "Left of Black", which is produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke. You can follow him on Twitter at @NewBlackMan.

Lester Spence

Johns Hopkins University

Lester Spence is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies, and is one of two co-directors of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. An award winning scholar, author, and teacher, Dr. Spence has published two books (Stare in the Darkness: Hip-hop and the Limits of Black Politics winner of the 2012 W. E. B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award, and Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, winner of both the Baltimore City Paper and Baltimore Magazine 2016 Best Nonfiction Book Awards and was named to The Atlantic’s 2016 “Best Books We Missed” list), one co-edited journal, over a dozen academic articles and several dozen essays and think pieces in a range of publications including The American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, The New York Times, Jacobin, Salon, and The Boston Review. He is currently at work on two book length projects examining the contemporary AIDS crisis in black communities, and the growing role of police in major American cities. 

Joseph Richard Winters

Duke University

Joseph Winters is an assistant professor of Religious Studies at Duke University with a secondary position in the Department of African and African American Studies. He holds a B.A. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from Princeton University. His interests lie in African-American Religious Thought, Religion and Critical Theory, Af-Am Literature, and Continental philosophy. Winters teaches and writes about religion and hip hop, religion, race, and film, critical approaches to religious studies, and the general connections between black studies and critical theory. Winters' first book, Hope Draped in Black: Race, Melancholy, and the Agony of Progress (Duke University Press, June 2016) examines how black literature and aesthetic practices challenge post-racial fantasies and triumphant accounts of freedom. The book shows how authors like WEB Du Bois and Toni Morrison link hope and possibility to melancholy, remembrance, and a recalcitrant sense of the tragic.