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Building Large-Scale, Master-Planned, Holistically-Designed Cities from Scratch: Re-Urbanism in Africa

Martin Murray
October 7th, 2015
1:00 PM

  Archived

Wednesday, October 7

12:00-1:15

Forum for Scholars and Publics, Old Chem 011

Light lunch served

Re-urbanism in Africa and elsewhere involves the construction of master- planned, holistically designed, and privately managed enclaves that appear like “alien spaceships” that drop in from somewhere else. In this discussion, Martin Murray places the processes of urban planning in contemporary Africa in historical context and explores their social, political, and economic consequences.

The commentator for this discussion is Anne-Maria Makhulu (Duke, Cultural Anthropology & AAAS).

 

The format of the seminar is that the speaker will pre-circulate a paper, then spend 10-15 minutes at the beginning highlighting its main points (and adding some larger context, discussing trends in the recent literature), before the respondent will take a few minutes to raise discussion points.  Then we’ll open it to the room for discussion.  If you’d like a copy of Murray’s paper, please contact Charlie Piot (cpiot@duke.edu).

 

This event is part of the series "The Future of the African City", co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics and the Duke Africa Initiative and organized by Professors John Bartlett, Charlie Piot, and Karin Shapiro. The African City Working Group is supported by the FHI Mellon Humanities Futures initiative.

Martin Murray

University of Michigan

Martin Murray is a professor in the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He began his academic career as sociologist with a strong foundation in urban geography. His current research engages the fields of urban studies and planning, global urbanism, cultural geography, distressed urbanism, development, historical sociology, and African studies.

Professor Murray has completed two books on city building and spatial politics in Johannesburg after apartheid. His current research focuses on two fields of inquiry: first, the trajectories of global urbanism at the start of the 21st century; and second, the turn toward master-planned, holistically-designed "private cities" built from scratch, especially those currently under construction or in the planning stages in urban Africa.

Anne-Maria Makhulu

Duke University

Anne-Maria Makhulu is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies at Duke University. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2003. Her research interests cover: Africa and more specifically South Africa, cities, space, globalization, political economy, occult economies, neoliberalism, Marxism, anthropology of finance, as well as questions of aesthetics, including the literature and cinema of South Africa. Makhulu is a contributor to Producing African Futures: Ritual and Reproduction in a Neoliberal Age (2004), and New Ethnographies of Neoliberalism (2010). She is a co-editor of Hard Work, Hard Times: Global Volatility and African Subjectivities (2010).