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Abderrahmane Sissako's "Timbuktu" and Contemporary Mali: A Discussion

September 16th, 2015
1:00 PM

  Archived

Noon on September 16th 2015

Forum for Scholars & Publics, 011 Old Chemistry Building, West Campus, Duke University

Join as at the Forum for Scholars and Publics in 011 Old Chemistry Building for a discussion with historian Bruce Hall and film studies scholar Amadou Fofana about the film "Timbuktu," a powerful and celebrated depiction of the occupation of the Mali town by Jihadists.

The film will be screened on Monday, September 14th at 7 p.m. in the Griffith Film Theatre of the Bryan Center on Duke's campus as part of the Center for French and Francophone Studies film series.

We will discuss both the political and cultural context depicted in the film and its place within the work of Sissako (the director of numerous films including Bamako) and the broader context of West African film.

A light lunch will be served for all participants beginning at 11:45.

Read a review of the film here.

Amadou Fofana

Williamette University & Duke University

Dr. Amadou T. Fofana is Associate Professor of French at Willamette University and a Humanities Writ-Large 2015-2016 Visiting Faculty Fellow at Duke University. He received a Licence es Lettres and a MaƮtrise in English from Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal. He also received an MA in French Literature and Civilization from Michigan State University, and his Ph.D. in African Languages and Literature from UW-Madison, WI. His research and teaching interests include French language and literature, Francophone literatures and cultures, African languages, literature and films.

Bruce Hall

Duke University

Bruce Hall is Associate Professor of History and African and African-American Studies at Duke University. His first book, A History of Race in Muslim West Africa, 1600-1960 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011), is about the development of ideas about racial difference along the West African Sahel. The research for this project was focused in and around the Malian town of Timbuktu. His current research centers on a nineteenth-century commercial network that connected Timbuktu with Ghadames (Libya), and which involved a number of literate slaves as commercial agents.