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The Hip Hop South: A Conversation with Regina N. Bradley

  Archived

FSP | Regina BradleyMonday, February 19, 2018
7:00 - 8:30 pm

Hayti Heritage Center
804 Old Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27701

Join us for a reading and discussion with writer and researcher Regina Bradley. Dr. Bradley will begin the evening with a reading from her 2017 short story collection, Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South. The reading will be followed by a conversation with Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions, and a book-signing and reception will conclude the evening.

Boondock Kollage is a collection of twelve short stories addressing issues of race, place, and identity in the post-Civil Rights American South. National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward (Salvage the Bones; Sing, Unburied, Sing) says of Bradley's writing:

"Boondock Kollage is an intricate collection of stories that will be new yet deeply familiar to any reader. These tales are new because they take place in rural Georgia, in a specific tree and lake studded landscape peopled with small, particular communities; they are familiar because the characters that people this place, with their wide, sloped shoulders, their intricate wigs, the way they shuffle and joke and comfort and misunderstand and shore each other up, are achingly human. In Bradley's hands, these varied pieces cohere into a deeply compelling, moving work of art. This collection will be deeply satisfying for the reader who wants to experience the full range of human emotion, who wants to feel fear, triumph, bone-deep sadness, and bright joy, because this author does it all."

In addition to being a critically acclaimed fiction writer, Dr. Regina Bradley is an accomplished scholar of popular culture, race, sound studies, the American South, and African American literature and Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University.

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics; Scalawag magazine; the Department of African & African American Studies; the Center for Arts, Digital Culture, and Entrepreneurship; Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity

The UNSUITABLE Series

  Archived

UNSUITABLE is an events series that engages students and members of the Durham community in a discussion of women’s interests and popular fiction. It is run in conjunction with "Publishing & Marketing Popular Fiction: A Case Study of the Romance Novel" course at Duke University.

All events are free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

 

Visit the UNSUITABLE website

 


Spring 2018 Events

 

UNSUITABLE #18 - Caroline Perny
"The Big Business of Selling Romance"
NOON, JAN 26, 011 OLD CHEM
Romance novels account for 34% of all fiction sold annually and have spawned some of the largest blockbuster franchises of our time. But what’s the real reason readers gobble them up? Strong heroines? Sex-on-the-page? The Happily Ever After? Muscly guys on the covers? Romance is both a niche market and a multi-billion dollar industry. How does a publishing company garner publicity, spur sales, and ultimately get respect for a genre that inspires both derision and adoration?

 

UNSUITABLE #19 - Damon Suede
"Queer Romance Goes Mainstream"
NOON, MARCH 23, 011 OLD CHEM
At its origins in the 1970’s, mainstream genre romance emphasized the love stories of heterosexual, cisgendered couples. LGBTQ romance was often categorized as “erotic” romance, even when the level of sensuality was similar to mainstream non-erotic romance. But recently, authors of genre romance featuring gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual protagonists have risen to the top of mainstream romance lists in contemporary, historical, paranormal and other categories. What part did authors, readers and publishing houses play in bringing this about?

 

UNSUITABLE #20 - Piper Huguley
"Religion, Race, and Readers: Writing African-American Inspirational Historical Romance"
NOON, APRIL 6, 225 FRIEDL
For decades, genre romance novels featuring heroes and heroines of color were considered niche market fiction, and likewise for “inspirational” romance featuring characters facing spiritual challenges. Now Christian fiction accounts for a massive proportion of the US fiction market, while authors of African-American romance are still fighting for equal recognition in a largely white industry. What role are both readers and publishers playing in increasing diversity in romance fiction, and how does an author of Christian African-American romance fight that battle as both writer and scholar?

 

UNSUITABLE #21 - Barbara Claypole White
"When Romance Isn't 'Trashy': Fiction and Perception"
NOON, APRIL 11, 011 OLD CHEM
“Women’s Fiction” is a broad category including contemporary blockbusters like Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love and Nicholas Sparks’s The Notebook, as well as light popular comedy like Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’ Diary and rich historical narratives like Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale. If all of these novels include central love stories, why aren’t they considered part of the huge romance genre? What determines how a novel will be packaged and sold: quality of writing, author platform, the seriousness of issues in the story, cover images, publicity and marketing departments, booksellers, or reader expectations? One author shares her experiences writing and publishing women’s fiction in the new millennium.

 

UNSUITABLE #22 - Erin Gloria Ryan, Charlotte Sussman, and Adriane Lentz-Smith
"From Harassment and Assault to Happily Ever After"
NOON, APRIL 23, PINK PARLOR IN EAST DUKE
As we grapple now with seemingly endemic sexual harassment and abuse across government, entertainment, education, medicine, sports, and other industries, we’ll look at the origins of the enduring trope that promises a woman a future full of romantic bliss and financial security—if only she submits against her will. Featuring senior editor at The Daily Beast Erin Gloria Ryan and professor of feminist literature Charlotte Sussman. Moderated by professor of African-American History Adriane Lentz-Smith.


Co-sponsors include Duke’s Forum for Scholars and Publics, African & African American Studies, History Department, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Religious Studies, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, #Artstigators, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute.


Spring 2018 Speakers

Hurricanes and Climate Change

  Archived

 

Monday, November 27, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

What do we know about the relationship between climate change and hurricanes? What can we expect from coming hurricane seasons, after this devastating one of 2017? What can communities and cities do to prepare for this changing reality? Duke professor Susan Lozier (Ocean Sciences) joins UNC professor Danielle Spurlock (Department of City and Regional Planning) in a conversation moderated by environmental journalist Sara Peach.

Sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

The Unknown Soldier by David Jay

  Archived

IN/VISIBLE WOUNDS


The Unknown Soldier by David Jay

The Unknown Soldier by David Jay

Fredric Jameson Gallery, Duke's East Campus
 November 7 - 17, 2017

Gallery Hours:
MON - FRI, 9 am - 6 pm
~ Open as well for scheduled talks and events ~

From November 7 – 17, 2017, Duke University’s Forum for Scholars and Publics will host THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER, the groundbreaking photography exhibit created by award-winning photographer David Jay. The exhibit will be held in the Fredric Jameson Gallery on the first floor of the Friedl Building on Duke’s East Campus.

I hope the images transcend the narrow and simplistic confines of “war” and encourage us to examine the way we engage each other – both friend and stranger – at its most basic, day-to-day level. —David Jay

THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER is a series of large-scale photographs of young and severely wounded soldiers returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Jay photographed his subjects in military hospitals, in their homes, and with their families, in an attempt to capture their lives following their injuries. “Ultimately,” writes Jay, THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER “is not about war. It presents an opportunity to open a dialogue about issues we are not necessarily comfortable with … and also issues that we are responsible for. The images can be uncomfortable for the viewer. It forces us to confront our fears and inhibitions about life, death, sexuality, sickness, relationships, etc. Reality is not always pretty. This is reality. Let’s address it.”

Find more information at veterans.dukefsp.org.

Pharoahe Monch’s PTSD: Hip-Hop, Black Men, and Mental Health

  Archived

Post-Event Coverage


Gabby Bulgarelli | The Durham VOICE

Pharoahe Monch Reflects on PTSD, Performs With PitchBlak Brass

The day after his 45th birthday, Queens-based rapper Pharoahe Monch settled into his seat in the Duke University Forum for Scholars and Publics. Monch is no stranger to Durham, his most recent visit being last spring when he performed at Art of Cool Fest. This time, however, his purpose was greater: a week in residence at Duke University. Monch spent his week attending Duke’s renowned History of Hip Hop Class (co-taught by Dr. Mark Anthony Neal and 9th Wonder), offering guidance to students, speaking at the Forum for Scholars and Publics, and performing at the Reynolds Industries Theater. CONTINUE READING


Wednesday, November 1, 2017
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem

A light lunch will be served.

In this wide-ranging talk, acclaimed Queens-based hip-hop artist Pharoahe Monch discusses his career, musical influences, and struggle with depression — a theme whose broader social and political implications he explored on his 2014 concept album, P.T.S.D. Moderated by Mark Anthony Neal, Professor and Chair of African and African American Studies at Duke University.

Co-sponsored by Duke Performances and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

Photo credit: Peter Goodbody.

MartyrLoserKing

  Archived

Thursday, October 6, 2016

12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Lunch served after talk

Full Frame Theater [Orange Power Plant Gallery icon] | Parking Info

FB RSVP (optional)

Join us at the Full Frame Theater for a conversation on activism and spoken word with Saul Williams, moderated by Mark Anthony Neal. Lunch will be provided after the conversation in the Power Plant Gallery. This conversation is followed by Saul Williams' performance with the Mivos Quartet on Friday, October 7 at 8:00 p.m. in the Nelson Music Room on East Campus. 

A part of the Talking Music: Conversations with Scholars, Writers, Archivists, and Artists series, co-sponsored by Duke Performances and the Forum for Scholars and Publics. This installment in the series is also co-sponsored by Left of Black: A Black Studies for a Mobile Digital Network, the Center for Arts, Digital Culture & Entrepreneurship (CADCE), and The Power Plant Gallery. (The Power Plant Gallery is an initiative of the Center for Documentary Studies and the Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University.)  

Presented as part of Duke Performances’ Hip-Hop Initiative, made possible, in part, with support from the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation. 

Musical Passage

  Archived

In 1688 a British naturalist and physician, Hans Sloane, visited the Caribbean colonies, spending the majority of his time in Jamaica, where he practiced medicine and collected cultural and ecological artifacts. Years later, in 1707, he published a narrative of his travels titled Voyage to the Islands. The book includes of the earliest and most substantial records of early African diasporic music in the Americas, including several pieces of musical notation, and the earliest known image of a banjo.

Over the centuries, African-descended performers would revolutionize music the world over, but few records exist of their earliest performances under bondage. The musical notation in Sloane’s book, and the accompanying descriptive passages lend insight into the complex world of music in Jamaican slave society.

In Musical Passage: Voyage to 1688 Jamaica, historian Laurent Dubois, composer David K. Garner, and literary scholar Mary Caton Lingold tell the story of this rare document alongside recordings that interpret the fascinating music. They highlight role of “Mr. Baptiste,” the unknown musician tasked with the writing of the notation, arguing that he may have been a freed black performer native to the colonies, and a composer. The website makes it possible to engage with the music of New World Africans whose enduring legacy fell silent in the historical record for far too long.

To access the site, visit www.musicalpassage.org. The creators welcome feedback, questions, and musical interpretations of the pieces via Twitter @musical_passage or email.

Read more from Duke Today and from project co-creator Mary Caton Lingold in her blog post for FSP.

Read more about the project in an essay written for Duke Magazine by FSP director and Musical Passage co-creator Laurent Dubois. 

Update January 2017: Musical Passage was selected for Slate's list of 5 great digital history projects of 2016.

Published by SX Archipelagos: A Small Axe Journal of Digital Practice, the project was funded by the Forum for Scholars and Publics and the Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University.

 

Musical Passage Jamaica Workshop 

On March 17, 2017, a group of musicians gathered at the Institute of Jamaica in Kingston. They were invited by Matthew Smith, Chair of the Department of History and Archaeology at UWI-Mona, and Herbie Miller, Director of the Jamaica Music Museum. The goal of the gathering was to have the musicians interpret songs from Seventeenth Century Jamaica that are presented and interpreted at the site musicalpassage.org. Each video in these series shows them listening to and then interpreting one of these songs. 

Musicians: Earl “Chinna” Smith and Inna de Yard, with special guests Anthony “Sangie” Davis, Maroghini, Vivian “Scotty” Scott, and Samuel “Time” Williams.

Radio Haiti Lives Web Project

  Archived

A selection of recordings from the archives of Radio Haiti have been released as part of the newly-launched website, radiohaitilives.com. The site currently features over 50 digitized audio recordings from the Radio Haiti Archives, a brief history of Radio Haïti-Inter, and historical background on the major themes covered in the recording. More recordings will continue to be added, as well as interactive content, such as timelines and maps, which will contextualize the recordings in the larger picture of 20th century Haitian history. 

The clips have been selected and digitized from the Radio Haiti Archives, donated to Duke University's David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library by Michéle Montas in April 2013. Over the course of several years, the entire donation will be digitized. The project will result in the preservation of the comprehensive archives of Radio Haïti-Inter, the voice of Haitian democracy from the station’s genesis in the 1960s to its closure in 2003.

Listen to Michéle Montas, Laurent Dubois, and Laura Wagner discuss the project on The State of Thingshttp://wunc.org/post/bringing-back-radio-haiti-station-told-overlooked-stories

The Music of Hispaniola

  Archived

Click to DownloadTuesday, March 27, 2018
12 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions


View the Black Atlantic Schedule of Events


Free and open to the public. A light lunch will be served.

Ned Sublette (Afropop Worldwide) and Laurent Dubois (Duke) will co-moderate a discussion in Spanish and English on the history of musical and cultural exchange between the two nations of Hispaniola, featuring Black Atlantic festival artists Joan Soriano (Dominican Republic) and Emeline Michel (Haiti).

Tickets and info for Soriano and Michel’s performances are available HERE.

Co-sponsored by Duke Performances and the Forum for Scholars and Publics at Duke University. Joan Soriano's residency is funded through Southern Exposure: Performing Arts of Latin America, a program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

UNSUITABLE #19: Queer Romance Goes Mainstream

  Archived

Friday, March 23, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

At its origins in the 1970's, mainstream genre romance emphasized the love stories of heterosexual, cisgendered couples. LGBTQ romance was often categorized as “erotic” romance, even when the level of sensuality was similar to mainstream non-erotic romance. But recently, authors of genre romance featuring gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual protagonists have risen to the top of mainstream romance lists in contemporary, historical, paranormal and other categories. What part did authors, readers and publishing houses play in bringing this about? Join us for a public conversation with romance author Damon Suede.

Co-sponsors include Duke’s Forum for Scholars and Publics, African & African American Studies, History Department, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Religious Studies, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, #Artstigators, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute.

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