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FSP@PPG: Creative Responses to the Threat of Nuclear War

  Archived

Click to download the posterFebruary 15, 2018
12 pm - 1:15 pm

Power Plant Gallery
American Tobacco Campus
320 Blackwell Street
Durham, NC 27701

View Map | Parking Info

This discussion will focus on the intersection of activism and art in response to the threat of nuclear war. Held in conjunction with the Power Plant Gallery's exhibit of artist Erin Johnson’s The Way Things Can Happen, which revisits the 1983 made-for-tv movie The Day After, the discussion will include Erin Johnson, UNC-Chapel Hill artist and professor elin O’Hara slavick, Durham-based freelance photographer, activist, and former social worker Jenny Warburg, and self-described "southern out black lesbian social justice activist" Mandy Carter. In addition to looking back to reactions to nuclear proliferation in the 1980s, we'll talk about the role of documentary and experimental arts in activism, connections and disjunctions among anti-war activism of the past and today's local social movements, and the role of women in documenting and resisting state-sponsored violence.

Photo credit: Erin Johnson, The Way Things Can Happen.

RightsWatch: The Truth About Rendition and Torture

  Archived

FSP | RightsWatchTuesday, January 23, 2018
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Duke Law School 4045

Professor Jim Coleman, a North Carolina Commission on the Inquiry of Torture (NCCIT) Commissioner, Dr. Christina Cowger, coordinator of North Carolina Stop Torture Now, Professor Jayne Huckerby, an expert witness and advisor to the NCCIT, Robin Kirk, a NCCIT Commissioner, and Catherine Read, Executive Director of the NCCIT, will discuss the work of the NCCIT, a non-governmental and state-level inquiry which recently held public hearings on North Carolina’s role in the CIA’s post-9/11 rendition, detention, and interrogation program. The speakers will discuss the citizen-led efforts that led to the creation of the Commission, the nature of North Carolina's involvement, the ways in which the NCCIT aims to seek accountability, and next steps as Commissioners work towards issuing findings and recommendations.
 
The talk will be moderated by Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic. Lunch will be provided.

This is part of the Human Rights in Practice series, which is co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, and the Center for International and Comparative Law. This is also presented in collaboration with RightsWatch, a Duke Human Rights Center @ the Franklin Humanities Institute & Forum for Scholars & Publics series. Additional co-sponsors include the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Human Rights Law Society, and International Law Society.
 
Read the Associated Press and Guardian coverage of the NCCIT hearings, Prof. Kirk in Newsweek and Profs. Huckerby & Fujimura-Fanselow in Just Security/Newsweek on the human rights and legal framework for accountability, and Duke Chronicle on the role of Duke professors in the NCCIT.

The Hip Hop South: A Conversation with Regina N. Bradley

  Archived

FSP | Regina BradleyMonday, February 19, 2018
7:00 - 8:30 pm

Hayti Heritage Center
804 Old Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27701

Join us for a reading and discussion with writer and researcher Regina Bradley. Dr. Bradley will begin the evening with a reading from her 2017 short story collection, Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South. The reading will be followed by a conversation with Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions, and a book-signing and reception will conclude the evening.

Boondock Kollage is a collection of twelve short stories addressing issues of race, place, and identity in the post-Civil Rights American South. National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward (Salvage the Bones; Sing, Unburied, Sing) says of Bradley's writing:

"Boondock Kollage is an intricate collection of stories that will be new yet deeply familiar to any reader. These tales are new because they take place in rural Georgia, in a specific tree and lake studded landscape peopled with small, particular communities; they are familiar because the characters that people this place, with their wide, sloped shoulders, their intricate wigs, the way they shuffle and joke and comfort and misunderstand and shore each other up, are achingly human. In Bradley's hands, these varied pieces cohere into a deeply compelling, moving work of art. This collection will be deeply satisfying for the reader who wants to experience the full range of human emotion, who wants to feel fear, triumph, bone-deep sadness, and bright joy, because this author does it all."

In addition to being a critically acclaimed fiction writer, Dr. Regina Bradley is an accomplished scholar of popular culture, race, sound studies, the American South, and African American literature and Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University.

Co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics; Scalawag magazine; the Department of African & African American Studies; the Center for Arts, Digital Culture, and Entrepreneurship; Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity

Impartiality, Trust, and Role Boundaries in Interpreting in Humanitarian and Healthcare Settings

  Archived

Tuesday, January 30, 2018
10:15 am - 11:15 am

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

The "conduit model" of interpreting would have us believe that experienced practitioners neutralize their individuality to become machines that spit out virtually identical products no matter the context in which they are deployed. This model also posits that interpreters do not need to understand what is going on in the interaction, nor trouble themselves with what the desired outcomes of the interaction may be.

In point of fact, interpreters in humanitarian and healthcare settings must become active participants who adapt to the context at hand, and who implement deliberate strategies to manage the complications and even conflicts that emerge during these unscripted interactions. The ability to quickly establish trust in stressful situations when you often do not know the parties well is crucial for successful interpreting. At the same time, interpreters must strive to maintain impartiality and refrain from offering helpful advice or projecting their own biases and beliefs onto the situation. Interpreters must not let any personal judgment of the content of the message nor prejudices against the parties involved guide what they interpret nor how they interpret it. And finally, defining and preserving clear role boundaries (interpreter, not public official; interpreter, not healthcare provider) is key for creating transparency and avoiding conflicts of interest.

So how do interpreters do it? How do they develop rapport and simultaneously remain impartial, and deliberate about not overstepping their bounds? Maha El-Metwally and Elena Langdon will speak to us about the challenges of interpreting in humanitarian and healthcare setting and share some of the strategies they have employed.

This event is organized by Joan Munné and Melissa Simmermeyer, Lecturers in the Department of Romance Studies, and has been made possible with the support of the Forum for Scholars and Publics, the Mary D.B.T. and J.H. Semans International Exchange Fund, the Trinity Language Committee, Duke Service-Learning, the Spanish Language Program, and Romance Studies at Duke University.

Visit sites.duke.edu/advancedspanishtranslation for more information.

The Grey Wolf & Bear: Turkish-Russian Relations

  Archived

FSP | Turkish-Russian RelationsFriday, February 16, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

Join us for a public conversation with former Ambassadors Jack Matlock (Russia) and Robert Pearson (Turkey) and visiting scholar Dimitar Bechev.

Co-sponsored by the Duke University Middle Eastern Studies Center (DUMESC), the Center for Slavic, Eurasion, and East European Studies, the Center for International & Global Studies, the Department of Political Science, and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

Before 'Global Modernisms': Renaissance, Reform, and Rewriting in the 19th-20th c. Global South

  Archived

Monday, January 29, 2017
11:45 am - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

Within the wide-ranging debates about "global modernisms," relatively little attention has been paid to the projects of cultural renewal and social reform that underwrote nationalist movements and literary modernity in a great variety of sites around the globe. This talk will reconsider the significance of these "renaissance" and reform movements, and in particular, the roles of language reform and indirect translation, for our historical understanding of global literary modernity. The talk will be followed by a Q&A discussion on her work with Nancy Armstrong and Shai Ginsburg.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (AMES), the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

UNSUITABLE #18: The Big Business of Selling Romance

  Archived

Friday, January 26, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

Romance novels account for 34% of all fiction sold annually and have spawned some of the largest blockbuster franchises of our time. But what’s the real reason readers gobble them up? Strong heroines? Sex-on-the-page? The Happily Ever After? Muscly guys on the covers? Romance is both a niche market and a multi-billion dollar industry. How does a publishing company garner publicity, spur sales, and ultimately get respect for a genre that inspires both derision and adoration? Join us for a public conversation with HarperCollins publicist Caroline Perny.

Co-sponsors include Duke’s Forum for Scholars and Publics, African & African American Studies, History Department, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Religious Studies, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, #Artstigators, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute.

The UNSUITABLE Series

  Archived

UNSUITABLE is an events series that engages students and members of the Durham community in a discussion of women’s interests and popular fiction. It is run in conjunction with "Publishing & Marketing Popular Fiction: A Case Study of the Romance Novel" course at Duke University.

All events are free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

 

Visit the UNSUITABLE website

 


Spring 2018 Events

 

UNSUITABLE #18 - Caroline Perny
"The Big Business of Selling Romance"
NOON, JAN 26, 011 OLD CHEM
Romance novels account for 34% of all fiction sold annually and have spawned some of the largest blockbuster franchises of our time. But what’s the real reason readers gobble them up? Strong heroines? Sex-on-the-page? The Happily Ever After? Muscly guys on the covers? Romance is both a niche market and a multi-billion dollar industry. How does a publishing company garner publicity, spur sales, and ultimately get respect for a genre that inspires both derision and adoration?

 

UNSUITABLE #19 - Damon Suede
"Queer Romance Goes Mainstream"
NOON, MARCH 23, 011 OLD CHEM
At its origins in the 1970’s, mainstream genre romance emphasized the love stories of heterosexual, cisgendered couples. LGBTQ romance was often categorized as “erotic” romance, even when the level of sensuality was similar to mainstream non-erotic romance. But recently, authors of genre romance featuring gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual protagonists have risen to the top of mainstream romance lists in contemporary, historical, paranormal and other categories. What part did authors, readers and publishing houses play in bringing this about?

 

UNSUITABLE #20 - Piper Huguley
"Religion, Race, and Readers: Writing African-American Inspirational Historical Romance"
NOON, APRIL 6, 225 FRIEDL
For decades, genre romance novels featuring heroes and heroines of color were considered niche market fiction, and likewise for “inspirational” romance featuring characters facing spiritual challenges. Now Christian fiction accounts for a massive proportion of the US fiction market, while authors of African-American romance are still fighting for equal recognition in a largely white industry. What role are both readers and publishers playing in increasing diversity in romance fiction, and how does an author of Christian African-American romance fight that battle as both writer and scholar?

 

UNSUITABLE #21 - Barbara Claypole White
"When Romance Isn't 'Trashy': Fiction and Perception"
NOON, APRI 11, 011 OLD CHEM
“Women’s Fiction” is a broad category including contemporary blockbusters like Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love and Nicholas Sparks’s The Notebook, as well as light popular comedy like Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’ Diary and rich historical narratives like Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale. If all of these novels include central love stories, why aren’t they considered part of the huge romance genre? What determines how a novel will be packaged and sold: quality of writing, author platform, the seriousness of issues in the story, cover images, publicity and marketing departments, booksellers, or reader expectations? One author shares her experiences writing and publishing women’s fiction in the new millennium.


Co-sponsors include Duke’s Forum for Scholars and Publics, African & African American Studies, History Department, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Religious Studies, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, #Artstigators, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute.


Spring 2018 Speakers

RESCHEDULED! Curating Prospect New Orleans: A Conversation with Trevor Schoonmaker

  Archived

NEW DATE!
Thursday, February 8, 2018
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem
Map & Directions

A light lunch will be served.

Join us for a conversation with Nasher Senior Curator Trevor Schoonmaker about his work curating the recent Prospect New Orleans art event. Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp is the fourth iteration of the citywide triennial art exhibition and features works by 73 artists spread across 17 venues. Designed to coincide with the 300th anniversary of the founding of La Nouvelle-Orléans/New Orleans, Prospect.4 traces connections to the city and its rich history of migration and cultural exchange through works by artists from North America, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe. Laurent Dubois will moderate the discussion.

Sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

Cover Art: Maria Berrio, Syzygy, 2017.

Learn more about Prospect New Orleans:

Prospect.4: The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp

Prospect.4, the fourth iteration of a citywide exhibition that opens November 16-19, 2017, finds inspiration in the lotus plant. This aquatic perennial takes root in the fetid but nutrient-rich mud of swamps so that its beautiful flower may rise above the murky water. The flower's grace is inextricably connected to the noisome swamp, just as redemption exists in ruin and creativity in destruction continue reading >>

 

Art in America Magazine  |  Brian Droitcour  |  Jan 1, 2018

Review: Prospect.4

Biennials usually balance works from and about disparate places with site-specific projects and gestures toward local culture, often by local artists. As a site for such a show, New Orleans poses a particular problem, laden as it is with tradition and myth. It's called North America's most African city, its most European city, its most Caribbean city. It's the "Gateway to the Americas" continue reading >>

 

New York Times  |  Ted Loos  |  Nov 26, 2017

In Prospect New Orleans, a Curator Guides 73 Artists Toward Higher Ground

Trevor Schoonmaker was hopping in and out of Uber cars recently as he raced around this soulful Southern city helping artists finalize works for the fourth edition of Prospect New Orleans, which has turned the entire city into a giant multicultural gallery. "The installation is the best part — you’ve been talking about the work for so long, and you’re finally seeing it in person," said Mr. Schoonmaker continue reading >>

 

New Orleans Gambit  |  D. Eric Bookhardt  |  Nov 21, 2017

Prospect.4: A Guide to the Art Around New Orleans - More Than 70 International Artists Explore the 'Global South'

The Lotus in Spite of the Swamp, the title of Prospect.4, the latest iteration of the Prospect New Orleans international art triennial, is as colorfully mysterious as its name implies. Like its predecessors, starting with Prospect founder Dan Cameron's stellar, critically acclaimed Prospect.1 in 2008-09, Prospect.4 makes the city itself part of the show — sometimes to an extent that makes it hard to tell where the art begins and the city recedes continue reading >>

Muslims Beyond the Arab World: Language, Arts, and Music in Senegal

  Archived

Poster | Fallou NgomTuesday, January 30, 2018
12 pm - 1 pm

Forum for Scholars and Publics
Duke's West Campus Quad
011 Old Chem

A light lunch will be served.

Join us for a conversation with Fallou Ngom, Director of the African Studies Center at Boston University, about Islam in contemporary Senegal. We will explore the ways in which Islam is lived in the country and its connections to language, the arts, and social life. The conversation will be moderated by Mbaye Lo.

Sponsored by the Duke Islamic Studies Center (DISC) and the Forum for Scholars and Publics.

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